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 Post subject: How to avoid deer and wildlife while driving?
Post Posted: Jul 10, 2018 10:08 am 
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I seen a 1/2 dozen deer carcasses on 285 yesterday and was wondering how to avoid a collision?


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 Post subject: Re: How to avoid deer and wildlife while driving?
Post Posted: Jul 10, 2018 10:15 am 
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Walk or avoid 285. ;)


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 Post subject: Re: How to avoid deer and wildlife while driving?
Post Posted: Jul 10, 2018 10:38 am 
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That pretty much sums it up.

Deer are stupid. And they like moving cars. Not a good combo.


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 Post subject: Re: How to avoid deer and wildlife while driving?
Post Posted: Jul 10, 2018 10:43 am 
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Although I won't say that my techniques are absolutely fool-proof, I would humbly offer a few suggestions.

First, if you can avoid driving around dusk and dawn (or at night for that matter) on mountain roads, then do so. I know that sounds corny, but that's when most of the animal activity occurs.

Second, if you, like many, must drive the mountain roads during dusk, dark, or dawn...then give driving your undivided attention. You are probably doing that anyway, but my wife watched a man mow down six deer in broad daylight on 285 near Foxton Road despite her stopping and flashing her lights at him. The driver was apparently doing something more important than driving. Hitting six deer pays hell on your car and if it's an elk, that 800 pound animal may end up through your windshield and kicking like a mule as it dies. A mom and her son were killed in just such a way in Evergreen no too long ago.

Third, when driving I have trained myself to constantly scan the sides of the road along with the road straight ahead. I often see drivers who seem to have tunnel vision and are oblivious to what's going on beyond the lane immediately in front of them. It's rare that large game run right out on the road. Yes, sometimes they do, but more often they are standing on the side of the road waiting to cross. They or their young may not pick the best time to do so.

Fourth, if you see others slowing down or stopping....flashing lights, you should safely slow down or stop and wonder why, and don't just blow by them like the dump truck did me recently on 285 near Crow Hill...nearly crushing the fawn that was trying to follow its mom across the road. He had lots of room to stop, but he chose to blow by me and pass in a no passing zone. He was clearly in a hurry.

Finally, just slow down. Again, I won't suggest that you personally do any of these things, but I've seen ample evidence of all five over the past 23 years or so up here. I moved here to look at the animals, not run them over. But maybe all that is out of style these days. Maybe we are just too busy to care.

My guess is that most of the larger animals hit on the road are hit at night or early by semis who no longer want to deal with I-70. But we could ALL slow down a bit and pay more attention to the road. I'm certain that if we all did, we would see a lot fewer dead animals on our roads.

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Last edited by Lionshead on Jul 10, 2018 1:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: How to avoid deer and wildlife while driving?
Post Posted: Jul 10, 2018 11:23 am 
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Lionshead wrote:
But we could ALL slow down a bit and pay more attention to the road. I'm certain that if we all did, we would see a lot fewer dead animals on our roads.



What a great summary. I think of all these things while going down the road, whether it be 285 or even our neighborly mountain road. They are all so important for things outside of animals too, people biking on the road, people running and walking, getting their mail; even riding motorcycles. I've noticed over the years that the attention to driving has decreased while the speeds of the cars have increased... a deadly match if you ask me.


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 Post subject: Re: How to avoid deer and wildlife while driving?
Post Posted: Jul 10, 2018 1:11 pm 
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Very well said Lionhead! So very true and perfect advice!

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 Post subject: Re: How to avoid deer and wildlife while driving?
Post Posted: Jul 10, 2018 2:50 pm 
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Yes, all good advice above. But (or however), even if you do that sometimes a critter (deer in my case) comes out of no where and hits you (in broad daylight no less).


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 Post subject: Re: How to avoid deer and wildlife while driving?
Post Posted: Jul 10, 2018 3:34 pm 
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One other thing: when you see one deer cross the road, don't look at it, look across the road where it came from. Most likely there are others about to cross too...


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 Post subject: Re: How to avoid deer and wildlife while driving?
Post Posted: Jul 10, 2018 5:02 pm 
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Lionshead wrote:
Although I won't say that my techniques are absolutely fool-proof, I would humbly offer a few suggestions.

First, if you can avoid driving around dusk and dawn (or at night for that matter) on mountain roads, then do so. I know that sounds corny, but that's when most of the animal activity occurs.

Second, if you, like many, must drive the mountain roads during dusk, dark, or dawn...then give driving your undivided attention. You are probably doing that anyway, but my wife watched a man mow down six deer in broad daylight on 285 near Foxton Road despite her stopping and flashing her lights at him. The driver was apparently doing something more important than driving. Hitting six deer pays hell on your car and if it's an elk, that 800 pound animal may end up through your windshield and kicking like a mule as it dies. A mom and her son were killed in just such a way in Evergreen no too long ago.

Third, when driving I have trained myself to constantly scan the sides of the road along with the road straight ahead. I often see drivers who seem to have tunnel vision and are oblivious to what's going on beyond the lane immediately in front of them. It's rare that large game run right out on the road. Yes, sometimes they do, but more often they are standing on the side of the road waiting to cross. They or their young may not pick the best time to do so.

Fourth, if you see others slowing down or stopping....flashing lights, you should safely slow down or stop and wonder why, and don't just blow by them like the dump truck did me recently on 285 near Crow Hill...nearly crushing the fawn that was trying to follow its mom across the road. He had lots of room to stop, but he chose to blow by me and pass in a no passing zone. He was clearly in a hurry.

Finally, just slow down. Again, I won't suggest that you personally do any of these things, but I've seen ample evidence of all five over the past 23 years or so up here. I moved here to look at the animals, not run them over. But maybe all that is out of style these days. Maybe we are just too busy to care.

My guess is that most of the larger animals hit on the road are hit at night or early by semis who no longer want to deal with I-70. But we could ALL slow down a bit and pay more attention to the road. I'm certain that if we all did, we would see a lot fewer dead animals on our roads.


Great advice. I was doing a whopping 40 MPH along the pass last night just thinking not if, but when. Elk sounds worse then a deer and a moose sounds like worst case scenario. I actually found a "deer horn", I forgot they even made these, but I've heard mixed reviews. https://www.amazon.com/Deer-Alert-Auto-Whistle-Horn/dp/B002V3LRCE Yesterday at crow hill traffic was stopped and an official had too shoot the deer, are citizens allowed to do that if the deer is still alive but dying?


Last edited by Rockyrock on Jul 10, 2018 6:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: How to avoid deer and wildlife while driving?
Post Posted: Jul 10, 2018 5:05 pm 
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Roz wrote:
Walk or avoid 285. ;)


Rollerblades might work if I can get a lift going up the hills.


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 Post subject: Re: How to avoid deer and wildlife while driving?
Post Posted: Jul 10, 2018 5:12 pm 
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Now that you mention it, I had some of those deer whistles on one of my car for many years as I commuted between Colorado Springs and this area. I don't know for sure if they worked or not, but it seemed the deer and elk perked up and paid attention as I came close. I never hit an animal despite all those miles. Maybe it was just luck. As for putting down an injured animal, my sense is that for safety purposes, either a police officer/sheriff's deputy or Park and Wildlife person must do this...but I'm just not sure. Great question.

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 Post subject: Re: How to avoid deer and wildlife while driving?
Post Posted: Jul 10, 2018 8:12 pm 
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Lionshead wrote:
Now that you mention it, I had some of those deer whistles on one of my car for many years as I commuted between Colorado Springs and this area. I don't know for sure if they worked or not, but it seemed the deer and elk perked up and paid attention as I came close. I never hit an animal despite all those miles. Maybe it was just luck. As for putting down an injured animal, my sense is that for safety purposes, either a police officer/sheriff's deputy or Park and Wildlife person must do this...but I'm just not sure. Great question.


I like those odds, i'm going to order one.


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