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 Post subject: Native Wild Flowers
Post Posted: Jun 28, 2011 12:26 pm 
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What types of native wild flowers grow near your property?

If we each add a couple of pics and do a little bit of reseach to provide info like, elevation, blooming season, light preferrence we could create quite a nice collection for future reference without too much work. Does anyone know how to make this a sticky?

Let's please keep this thread to just the native varieties. We can always create another thread dedicated to non-native plants which still thrive in our high altitudes climate.

So we must start off with the beautiful Colorado state flower

Rocky Mountain Columbine (Aquilegia caerules).

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They can grow all the way up to the timberline but do best when lower than 11,000 ft. They typically bloom in late spring through mid summer. They prefer partial shade. Dead heading will extent the blooming season.

The yellow variety Aquilegia chrysantha which prefers more sun is also native to Colorado but I don't have any in my yard. Perhaps someone else could add that pic.



Various varieties of penstemons are native to this area. I'm not 100% certain which variety this one is but I believe it is

Rocky Mountain Penstemon (Penstemon strictus)
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It grows up to 10,000 ft. Blooms early summer in full sun and mid to late summer when in partial shade.


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Post Posted: Jun 28, 2011 12:34 pm 
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Blue Flax (Linum lewisli)
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Grows up to 9,500 ft. Blooms late spring through mid summer (depending on elevation and sun exposure). Prefers full sun but will tolerate partial shade.


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Post Posted: Jul 3, 2011 5:22 am 
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Blue Eyed Grass (Sisyrinchium montanum) - member of the iris family.

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I've seen blue eyed grass in several places on my property. This particular plant was in the middle of one of my vegetable garden beds when I was going to till the bed. Rather then just kill the poor thing, I transplanted it to one of my rock gardens. It survived and blooms every year. The blooms, however, are hard to catch as it blooms only on sunny days, in the late afternoon, for a very short period of time.


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Post Posted: Jul 3, 2011 7:45 am 
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Blanketflower (Gaillardia aristata)

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Blanketflower (Gaillardia aristata) is a colorful perennial flower that is an excellent choice for the cutting garden. Native to the northern regions of North America (including Canada), as well as California and the southwestern US (except Nevada), it is a member of the Aster plant family (Asteraceae) family. Blanketflower is hardy between USDA zones 3 and 8.

Blanketflower is also known as Indian blanket, but is also referred to by its genus name, Gaillardia or as common gaillardia. The showy flowers bloom from May to September and attract butterflies. In the wild, blanketflower is found in meadows, prairies, grasslands, and mountain foothills at elevations up to 9,000 feet. It is drought tolerant and the soil should be allowed to dry out before subsequent watering.

Blanketflower thrives in full sun growing to a height of 1.5 to 2 feet. It is easily propagated by seed or root cuttings and will naturalize forming clumps or colonies. In addition to cutting and perennial gardens, blanketflower en masse is a good choice for roadside plantings or along edges of open fields.


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Post Posted: Jul 3, 2011 8:03 am 
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Indian Paintbrush- (Castilleja), or Prairie-fire

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Many varieties through out the north west. Annual/Perennial: Perennial
Flowers: May to September Flower size: 1.5" to 2" Found in: Foothills to Subalpine
The flowers of Indian paintbrush are edible and sweet, and were consumed in moderation by various Native American tribes as a condiment with other fresh greens. These plants have a tendency to absorb and concentrate selenium in their tissues from the soils in which they grow, and can be potentially very toxic if the roots or green parts of the plant are consumed.


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Post Posted: Jul 15, 2011 2:40 pm 
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Aspen Fleabane (Erigeron speciosus) - part of the aster family
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Common Names: Dainty Daisy, Daisy Fleabane, Aspen Fleabane

Bloom Time: The internet says spring through summer. So it must depend on altitude, because at 9000 ft in Bailey, CO it is mid-Summer through to first frost.

Height: 8” to 24”

Light: Full Sun to Part Shade

This native wildflower is often called the Dainty Daisy, and it does indeed look like a sweet, dainty version of the common daisy! Small violet blossoms, consisting of many tiny petals surrounding a yellow center. Drought tolerant and deer resistant! The name “fleabane” is derived from a belief that the dried flowers repel fleas!


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Post Posted: Aug 1, 2011 2:41 pm 
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The flowers up here are amazing,I just moved up here in January and can't believe their beautiful abundance and variety! Thank you for that information because I am not familiar at all with these wild flowers and wish to know the names of all of them.
I have some purple bell like looking flowers in my yard any ideas?


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Post Posted: Aug 1, 2011 2:47 pm 
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JMiller wrote:
Indian Paintbrush- (Castilleja), or Prairie-fire

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Many varieties through out the north west. Annual/Perennial: Perennial
Flowers: May to September Flower size: 1.5" to 2" Found in: Foothills to Subalpine
The flowers of Indian paintbrush are edible and sweet, and were consumed in moderation by various Native American tribes as a condiment with other fresh greens. These plants have a tendency to absorb and concentrate selenium in their tissues from the soils in which they grow, and can be potentially very toxic if the roots or green parts of the plant are consumed.


I didn't know Indian Paintbrush was edible! I'd also love to know how to tell when seeds can be harvested. We have a whopping two of these on our property and would love to have a bunch more!!!!

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Post Posted: Aug 1, 2011 5:59 pm 
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dragona72 wrote:
The flowers up here are amazing,I just moved up here in January and can't believe their beautiful abundance and variety! Thank you for that information because I am not familiar at all with these wild flowers and wish to know the names of all of them.
I have some purple bell like looking flowers in my yard any ideas?

can you get a picture of them? we do have blue colored bells called harebells - there's purple colored penstemon (a few species). the harebells are radially symetrical (the same all the way around), the penstemon is not


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Post Posted: May 10, 2012 6:59 pm 
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I have Pasque flowers in my yard. Cute little things.

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The genus Pulsatilla is sometimes considered a subgenus under the genus Anemone.

The flower blooms early in spring, which leads to the common name Pasque flower, since Pasque refers to Easter (Passover).


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Post Posted: May 24, 2012 12:13 pm 
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CrazyWolf wrote:
I have Pasque flowers in my yard. Cute little things.

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The genus Pulsatilla is sometimes considered a subgenus under the genus Anemone.

The flower blooms early in spring, which leads to the common name Pasque flower, since Pasque refers to Easter (Passover).


I was wondering what those were.. I have pink and white ones.. Thanks!!!

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Post Posted: May 24, 2012 12:14 pm 
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dragona72 wrote:
The flowers up here are amazing,I just moved up here in January and can't believe their beautiful abundance and variety! Thank you for that information because I am not familiar at all with these wild flowers and wish to know the names of all of them.
I have some purple bell like looking flowers in my yard any ideas?


Probably blue bells.. they are so blue the do look purple..

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