It is currently Dec 9, 2018 12:39 pm 




Do you or someone you know need some help with a project?
Click here to contact the Neighborhood Action Team.



Reply to topic  [ 4454 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 358, 359 ... 372  Next

Previous topic | Next topic 

  Print view

Offline 
 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Aug 11, 2018 7:39 am 
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
User avatar
Joined: Jun 14, 2002 1:22 pm
Posts: 10531
Location: Pine Junction (Woodside)
When Was Australia A British Prison Colony And How Many Convicts Did The British Send To Australia?

Australia was originally a British prison colony.

Image

Image

Beginning in the late 1700s, the United Kingdom sent convicted criminals to this faraway territory.

Image

Until that time, the British had been sending convicts to their American colonies, but the American Revolution put an end to that practice.

Image
British prisoners were sent to America until the revolution

Over a period of 80 years, some 160,000 convicts were put on ships to Australia.

Image

Image

Image

Image

But once the word got out in the 1850s that Australia’s hills were rich with gold, thousands of British immigrants began to move there on their own.

Image

The six original crown colonies became a federation and the Commonwealth of Australia was formed on 1 January 1901.

Image

Australia’s capital city is Canberra, in the Australian Capital Territory.

Image

In Depth

_________________
Quote:

"We ... would rather die on our feet than live on our knees." ~ Franklin D. Roosevelt


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Aug 12, 2018 7:34 am 
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
User avatar
Joined: Jun 14, 2002 1:22 pm
Posts: 10531
Location: Pine Junction (Woodside)
What Is The Difference Between Latin America And South America And How Many People Live In Latin America?

South America is not the same as Latin America.

Image
South America is a part of Latin America

Latin America refers more to culture than geography.

Image
Culture v. Geography

Latin America usually means South America as well as Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean, which are geographically part of North America.

Image

Many of these countries were settled by Spanish, Portuguese, and French colonists.

Image

All of those groups speak languages that evolved from Latin, thus the term Latin America.

Image

Roughly three out of every four people in South America live in cities.

Image

Latin America can be subdivided into several sub-regions based on geography, politics, demographics and culture.

Image

In 2009, the population of Latin America was estimated at more than 568 million and growing.

Image

In Depth

_________________
Quote:

"We ... would rather die on our feet than live on our knees." ~ Franklin D. Roosevelt


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Aug 13, 2018 7:43 am 
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
User avatar
Joined: Jun 14, 2002 1:22 pm
Posts: 10531
Location: Pine Junction (Woodside)
Is The Bald Eagle Really Bald?

The bald eagle is not bald, but is so called because it has a head of pure white feathers.

Image

Its tail is also white, but the rest of its feathers are dark brown.

Image

Known as the “king of birds,” the bald eagle looks majestic and proud, and seems to typify a spirit of independence.

Image

Our founding fathers also must have recognized this, for the bald eagle was chosen for our national emblem in 1782. At that time, the bald eagle was a familiar sight in every part of the country.

Image

In the mid-20th century, however, the pesticide Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) was determined to cause eagle eggshells to become thin and brittle. According to Wikipedia “Female eagles laid eggs that were too brittle to withstand the weight of a brooding adult, making it nearly impossible for the eggs to hatch.” The Bald Eagle population in the lower 48 states got to as low as 500 nesting pairs. Thankfully, DDT was banned in 1972, which then allowed the resurgence of the eagle population; which at present stands at roughly 35,000 nesting pairs in the lower 48, but mostly in Alaska.

Image

Image
Taking flight in Alska

Most birds have keener sight than humans and other animals, but the eagle is said to have the keenest sight of all.

Image

Bald eagles mate for life and use the same nest year after year.

Image

Image

Made of sticks, these nests grow each year as the eagles add to them until they measure 10 feet across and weigh hundreds of pounds!

Image

Image


In Depth

_________________
Quote:

"We ... would rather die on our feet than live on our knees." ~ Franklin D. Roosevelt


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Aug 14, 2018 7:26 am 
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
User avatar
Joined: Jun 14, 2002 1:22 pm
Posts: 10531
Location: Pine Junction (Woodside)
Where Does Caviar Come From?

The expensive delicacy called caviar is made from the roe, or eggs, of a big fish called the sturgeon. These fish live mostly in salt-water lakes in certain parts of Europe and Asia.

Image
The fish

Image

Sturgeon leave their lakes to lay their eggs in river beds, and when they do, fishermen catch the fish and put them in underwater farming cages.

Image
Farming cage

Image
Farming cage

When the eggs are fully developed, the fish are killed and the eggs are removed from their bodies. Then the roe is kept in salty water for a time, put into jars or tins, and shipped to caviar lovers all over the world.

Image

Image

Some of the biggest sturgeon are over 12 feet long, and weigh a ton. A single fish this size can produce up to 130 pounds of caviar.

Image
11’ 2”, 900 lbs

With caviar costing over ten dollars an ounce, a single giant sturgeon might produce $20,000 worth of caviar!

Image

In Depth

_________________
Quote:

"We ... would rather die on our feet than live on our knees." ~ Franklin D. Roosevelt


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Aug 15, 2018 7:29 am 
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
User avatar
Joined: Jun 14, 2002 1:22 pm
Posts: 10531
Location: Pine Junction (Woodside)
When Galaxies Collide

It is very common for galaxies to collide and interact with other galaxies. In fact, it is now believed that collisions and mergers between galaxies are one of the main elements that drive their evolution in time. Most galaxies probably had interactions with other galaxies since the time they formed.

Image
Hubble image

A galaxy is made of roughly 100 billion stars. So you would think that in a head on collision between two galaxies, there would be countless collisions between those stars, right? The fact is that in such a collision, the probability of two stars colliding is almost 0. This is because even though there are an incredibly large number of stars in the galaxies, the density of stars is not very big since the galaxies are extremely big. In other words, the sizes of the stars are very small compared to the average distance between them. This means that if galaxies were made only of stars, and that two of them would go on a head on collision, they would pass one through another without being much affected!

Image

This is however not what we observe when we look at galaxies interacting. The reason is that the space between stars in galaxies is not empty: it is full of gas and dust. This material will interact when the galaxies collide. It can interact gravitationally, the galaxies can pull on the material in the other galaxies and disrupt their morphologies. There is also friction between the gas in the colliding galaxies, causing shock waves that can trigger some star formation in the galaxies.

Image

These processes can radically affect the galaxies. For example, two spiral galaxies can merge to form an elliptical galaxy. Galaxies that collide with one another will take millions of years to merge (which is very quick on the astronomical time scale!), we cannot observe their evolution. When we catch two galaxies in the process of merging, we can only get a snapshot of one step in their interaction. In order to produce a series of pictures showing the evolution, we have to observe many pairs of similar galaxies at different points in the history of their merging, and then play a game of putting these images in a time sequence.

Image
Timed sequence example

Thanks to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), NASA astronomers are announcing that they can now predict with certainty the next major cosmic event to affect our galaxy, sun, and solar system: the titanic collision of our Milky Way galaxy with the neighboring Andromeda galaxy.

Image

The Milky Way is destined to get a major makeover during the encounter, which is predicted to happen four billion years from now. It is likely the sun will be flung into a new region of our galaxy, but our Earth and solar system are in little or no danger of being destroyed.

Image

"Our findings are statistically consistent with a head-on collision between the Andromeda galaxy and our Milky Way galaxy," said Roeland van der Marel of the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore. The solution came through painstaking NASA Hubble Space Telescope measurements of the motion of Andromeda, which also is known as M31. The galaxy is now 2.5 million light-years away, but it is inexorably falling toward the Milky Way under the mutual pull of gravity between the two galaxies and the invisible dark matter that surrounds them both.

Image

The space shuttle servicing missions to Hubble upgraded it with ever more-powerful cameras, which have given astronomers a long-enough time baseline to make the critical measurements needed to nail down M31's motion. The Hubble observations and the consequences of the merger are reported in three papers that will appear in an upcoming issue of the Astrophysical Journal.

Image
HST resolution improvements over time

A century ago astronomers did not realize that M31 was a separate galaxy far beyond the stars of the Milky Way. Edwin Hubble measured its vast distance by uncovering a variable star that served as a "milepost marker."

Image

Image

Hubble went on to discover the expanding universe where galaxies are rushing away from us, but it has long been known that M31 is moving toward the Milky Way at about 250,000 miles per hour. That is fast enough to travel from here to the moon in one hour. The measurement was made using the Doppler effect, which is a change in frequency and wavelength of [sound/radio/light] waves produced by a moving source relative to an observer, to measure how starlight in the galaxy has been compressed by Andromeda's motion toward us.

Image
Doppler effect

As already hinted, though, there's no need for panic. The initial collision isn't scheduled for at least four billion years and it'll take another two billion years of cosmic reorganization before the new galaxy assumes a regular form. van der Marel said the chances of the Sun or any of the planets being hit in the collision was "vanishingly small," but that the Solar System would most likely end up on the outer fringes of the new galaxy. Whether anything recognizable as human beings would be around is another matter entirely. The Sun would be slightly hotter, too hot for life as we know it here on Earth, but van der Marel said that there would still be the same number of planets in similar orbits to those observed today. The night sky will certainly be different however, according to NASA computer simulations.

Image
The collision simulations as would be seen from earth over the eons

In Depth

_________________
Quote:

"We ... would rather die on our feet than live on our knees." ~ Franklin D. Roosevelt


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Aug 16, 2018 7:45 am 
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
User avatar
Joined: Jun 14, 2002 1:22 pm
Posts: 10531
Location: Pine Junction (Woodside)
How Was Time Invented And When?

Far back in the mists of time, people must have got fed up with everyone being late for everything.

Image

Someone came up with the bright idea of time and how to measure it.

Image

Second Nature. The most obvious way of measuring time is, of course, the Sun coming up, going down and then coming up again: a day. People probably caught on to that one fairly fast. And the Moon goes through phases, from a sliver to a circle, of about a month, which divides time into bigger chunks.

Image
The Earth rotates on its axis in 24 hours

Image
The Moon rotates around the Earth approx every month

The Ancient Egyptians came up with the 365-day calendar. They’d noticed that some things happened once every twelve months, like the flooding of the River Nile. The earliest recorded year was 4236 BC.

Image

If you want to be a bit more specific, you need to divide up the day into smaller chunks. The ancient Babylonians came up with 60 seconds in a minute, 60 minutes in an hour and 24 hours in a day.

Image

Ever since then, people have been inventing time-measuring devices: clocks.

Image

Image

1 year is equal to 12 months • 52 weeks • 365 days • 8,760 hours 525,600 minutes • 31,536,000 seconds

10 years is equal to 1 decade • 120 months • 520 weeks • 3,650 days • 87,600 hours • 5,256,000 minutes • 315,360,000 seconds

100 years is equal to: 1 century • 10 decades • 1,200 months • 5,200 weeks • 36,500 days • 876,000 hours • 52,560,000 minutes • 3,153,600,000 seconds


BUT these sums don’t include leap years. A leap year consists of 366 days instead of 365. This extra day is added to February every four years, giving the month 29 days instead of 28.

Image

AND if that isn’t enough to think about there are also leap seconds!

Image

Believe it or not but some years are longer than others! Every now and again scientists add an extra second to the year (and sometimes two in a year). There have been 27 leap seconds in the last 56 years. The last leap second to be added was to the end of 31 December 2016, making the time 23:59.60 – so hang a few extra seconds on to your answers for good measure!

Wikipedia: A leap second is a one-second adjustment that is
occasionally applied to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) in
order to keep its time of day close to the mean solar time as
realized by UT1. Without such a correction, time reckoned by
Earth's rotation drifts away from atomic time because of
irregularities in the Earth's rate of rotation. Since this system
of correction was implemented in 1972, 27 leap seconds have
been inserted, the most recent on December 31, 2016 at
23:59:60 UTC.


Sundials were used to measure time over 5,000 years ago. Water clocks, which drip water at a constant rate, told the time in Egypt and Babylon around 3,500 years ago.

Image

Image

Dutch scientist Chrishaan Huygens invented the first mechanical pendulum clock in 1656. In the 20th century mechanical clocks were replaced by quartz-crystal clocks, in which crystals vibrate at a constant rate.

Image

Atomic clocks use the resonance of atoms to measure time. The first accurate one was built by Louis Essen in 1955. But not many people need to be that precise.

Image
Louis Essen and the first atomic clock

Lunar-ticks: Sticks and bones with lines and holes scratched into them dating from 20,000 years ago are thought to be Ice-Age Moon calendars. Notches carved into the sticks are thought to represent days between each phase of the Moon.

Image
This one used by Native Americans

In Depth

_________________
Quote:

"We ... would rather die on our feet than live on our knees." ~ Franklin D. Roosevelt


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Aug 17, 2018 7:29 am 
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
User avatar
Joined: Jun 14, 2002 1:22 pm
Posts: 10531
Location: Pine Junction (Woodside)
What Does The Word “Buckaroo” Mean In Spanish And Where Did The Term Come From?

The English word “buckaroo” for cowboy is a corrupt form of the Spanish word “vaquero.”

Image
Vaquero

The name fits, because Anglo cowboys learned a lot of their trade from Mexican Americans, who were experts in western-style ranching long before the Anglos arrived.

Image

Many of the cowboy techniques, equipment, and apparel we think of as distinctively American were actually copied from Latinos. The western saddle, chaps (or leather trousers), wide-brimmed hats to shield the face from the sun, the practices of rounding up and roping cattle on horseback, all these began with Mexican vaqueros.

Image

Image

Image

Many western words come from Spanish, including rodeo, lariat, lasso, mustang, and chaparral.

Image
Mustang

Image
Lasso

Image
Chaparral (tangled vegitation)

_________________
Quote:

"We ... would rather die on our feet than live on our knees." ~ Franklin D. Roosevelt


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Aug 18, 2018 7:54 am 
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
User avatar
Joined: Jun 14, 2002 1:22 pm
Posts: 10531
Location: Pine Junction (Woodside)
Abracadabra

When stage conjurers and magicians come to the finale of a trick and exclaim 'Abracadabra!' the implication is that a mysterious power is being summoned to perform the required magic. In our information age, in which it is possible to look up how virtually any stunt is staged, we don't take the claims of magical powers too seriously. That wasn't the case when the word 'abracadabra' was first in common use.

Image

Medieval folk believed in magic as everyday fact and any unusual event that they couldn't explain was considered to be the result of some form of enchantment. They used the incantation 'Abracadabra' to ward off such bewitchment and as a remedy for poor health. The word was recited repeatedly, each time with the final letter being removed, until just 'a' remained. It was believed that the strength of the illness diminished as the word became shorter. The charm was also written out on paper and worn in an amulet or sewn into clothing.

Image

Image

No one is sure as to the origin of the strange word 'abracadabra'. It is known to have been in use in 4th century Latin but there are several theories that place the derivation earlier, including:

===============

1. Roman sages, notably Serenus Sammonicus, coined the word and devised the repeated word formula in the 2nd century AD.

2. It being related to another magical word - 'abraxas'. In the Greek system of alphabetic numerology this word is significant in that it contains letters that add up to 365, the number of days in the year.

3. The word is of Hebrew or Aramaic origin, being derived either from the Hebrew words 'ab' (father), 'ben' (son), and 'ruach hakodesh' (holy spirit), or from the Aramaic 'avra kadavra', meaning 'it will be created in my words'.


===============

Sadly, none of these theories stands up to close examination and actual documentary evidence is as insubstantial as those fragments of medieval paper. A reference in print to the use of the word in English dating back to 1582 is found in Eva Rimmington Taylor's The Troublesome Voyage of Capt. Edward Fenton:

===============

”Banester sayth yt he healed 200 in one yer of an ague by hanging abracadabra about their necks.”

===============

The belief in the power of the word lasted well into the 18th century. In his Journal of the Plague Year, 1722, Daniel Defoe was saddened by the continuing superstition of the populace when faced with the threat of plague:

===============

”People deceiv'd; and this was in wearing Charms, Philters, Exorcisms, Amulets, and I know not what Preparations, to fortify the Body with them against the Plague; as if the Plague was but a kind of a Possession of an evil Spirit; and that it was to be kept off with Crossings, Signs of the Zodiac, Papers tied up with so many Knots; and certain Words, or Figures written on them, as particularly the Word Abracadabra, form'd in Triangle, or Pyramid...

How the poor People found the Insufficiency of those things, and how many of them were afterwards carried away in the Dead-Carts.


===============

Over time the belief in the power of 'abracadabra' receded and in the 19th century it came to mean 'fake magic'. Terms like 'legal abracadabra' were used to denote the flummoxing of juries by fast-talking lawyers.

Image

Stage conjurers then adopted it into their inventory of the 'magic' words they used to punctuate their acts and the first known usage of it in that context dates from 1819.

Image

Some of these words, like 'hocus-pocus' (1634), 'abraxas' (1569) and 'hey presto' (1732), have a long history and a link to supernatural beliefs. Others, like hey-presto's American form 'presto changeo' (1905) and 'shazam' (1940) are pure stage patter.

Image

Younger readers may be familiar with the 'killing curse' from the Harry Potter books - 'avada kedavra', which Rowling adapted from the Aramaic. UK residents of a certain age will always prefer the 'magic' spiel of Sooty and Sweep's mentor Harry Corbett - 'Izzy, Wizzy, let's get busy'.

Image


In Depth

_________________
Quote:

"We ... would rather die on our feet than live on our knees." ~ Franklin D. Roosevelt


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Aug 19, 2018 7:45 am 
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
User avatar
Joined: Jun 14, 2002 1:22 pm
Posts: 10531
Location: Pine Junction (Woodside)
Who Was Samuel de Champlain?

Champlain, a Frenchman, gained experience in navigation on voyages to the West Indies and Central America in the late 1500s.

Image
Samuel de Champlain

Image

Champlain’s skill drew the notice of the French king Henry IV. Invited by the king, Champlain accompanied a French expedition up the St. Lawrence River in North America in 1603.

Image
King Henry IV of France

In 1608, Champlain returned and founded a trading post called Quebec. Using the post as his base, Champlain traveled on foot and by canoe into the mountains to the south, gazing upon the giant lake in northern New York that bears his name today, Lake Champlain.

Image
Abitation de Quebec, 1608, established by Samuel de Champlain

Image

Image
Lake Champlain

In 1615, Champlain traveled through the rugged forests to the west and paddled across the first of the Great Lakes, Lake Ontario. Champlain’s routes were followed by French trappers eager to trade with Indians. As a result, French settlements gradually grew in Canada.

Image

In Depth

_________________
Quote:

"We ... would rather die on our feet than live on our knees." ~ Franklin D. Roosevelt


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Aug 20, 2018 7:34 am 
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
User avatar
Joined: Jun 14, 2002 1:22 pm
Posts: 10531
Location: Pine Junction (Woodside)
Did a Beard Ever Start a War?

Surprisingly enough, yes! It all happened back in 1152 in France. King Louis VII, who wore a beard, married the lovely Eleanor of Aquitane, daughter of a French duke. As a dowry, Eleanor’s father gave Louis two provinces in Southern France.

Image
King Louis VII of France

Image
Eleanor of Aquitane

Then Louis went off to the 2nd Crusades and, alas, returned without his beard. Eleanor said he looked ugly without the beard and asked him to grow another. Louis refused. Eleanor then divorced him and married King Henry II of England.

Image
A beardless King Louis VII of France

Eleanor wanted her father’s two provinces to give to her new husband, but Louis refused. Henry therefore declared war on France to get those provinces by force. That war, called the “War of the Whiskers” lasted 301 years!

Image
King Henry II of England

Image
Battle of Rouen 1453: Final battle of the War of the Whiskers

_________________
Quote:

"We ... would rather die on our feet than live on our knees." ~ Franklin D. Roosevelt


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Aug 21, 2018 7:25 am 
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
User avatar
Joined: Jun 14, 2002 1:22 pm
Posts: 10531
Location: Pine Junction (Woodside)
What Animal Never Drinks Water In Its Entire Life?

The tiny kangaroo rat, a native of the southwestern deserts of the United States, never takes a drink of water in its lifetime.

Image

What little water this tiny rodent needs it gets from lowering its metabolic rate (to conserve moisture) and from eating moisture-laden roots and desert plants. This is enough to keep the kangaroo rat alive.

Image

The kangaroo rat got its name from the fact that it has the same long, powerful legs and the same strong tail as its Australian namesake. It moves about by leaping, but with such accuracy that it can jump over a cactus and land on top of a grasshopper.

Image

When two kangaroo rats fight, they look like tiny mice on pogo sticks!

Image

In Depth

_________________
Quote:

"We ... would rather die on our feet than live on our knees." ~ Franklin D. Roosevelt


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Aug 22, 2018 7:34 am 
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
Pinecam Hall of Fame poster!
User avatar
Joined: Jun 14, 2002 1:22 pm
Posts: 10531
Location: Pine Junction (Woodside)
The Mima Mounds In Washington State Are A Phenomenon Unexplained By Science

20 miles south of Olympia, Washington, there's a strange sight: The ground is punctuated by hundreds of grass-covered mounds stretching over several hundred acres. These are known as the Mima Mounds, and after decades of research, nobody knows what caused them. Although scientists and explorers believed they'd solved the puzzle of this mysterious land formation at various times, virtually every one turned out to be wrong. You still have a chance to be the hero. Determine how these mimas came to be all in one place and you'll go down in the history books.

Image

More than two million years ago, massive ice sheets covered the land that is now Washington. According to the Department of Natural Resources (DNR), the soil of the Mima Mounds developed sometime after these ice-age glaciers started to retreat, 16,500 years ago. As the ice melted, it gathered up massive loads of gravel and rock along the way. That accumulation of melted ice and stone spread over Western Washington, creating the unusual black, gravelly soil that eventually formed the mounds. Scientists might understand how the soil was formed, but they're just as puzzled about the origin of the mounds as explorers centuries ago.

Image

Image

Image

Captain Charles Wilkes, an explorer in the Northwest, stumbled on these round elevations in about 1841. Because of their size — each measured around 6 feet (2 meters) tall and 30 feet (9 meters) wide — he speculated they held deceased members of local tribes. To find out, he dug into a few. He didn't find any trace of humans: just rocks and soil.

Image
Captain Charles Wilkes

The folktale told by the Upper Chehalis Tribe is more mythical: Thrush, a tribal member, refused to bathe or cleanse her face for fear something bad would happen to the Earth. After much harassment from her people, she gave in and washed her face. It rained so hard the world flooded. When the water receded, the prairie land below took on the shape of waves.

Image

In 1942, Walter Dalquest, a professor at the University of Washington, and Victor Scheffer, a biologist, unequivocally stated in the "Journal of Geology" that pocket gophers created the Mima Mounds. Others have agreed (see below), and some say the mystery has been solved. Scientists are still pursuing the pocket gopher hypothesis, but nobody has conclusively proven that they're the culprits behind the Mima Mounds. Which came first: the gophers or the mounds? Nobody knows for sure.

Image

Image
Pocket Gopher

Other hypotheses say that they formed via shock waves from earthquakes, ancient floods, or runoff from the glaciers themselves. Some say it may have been the result of the frozen ground cracking into multi-sided shapes at the end of the ice age. That could have allowed ice to wedge into the cracks and leave the soil mounded when it melted.

Image
Erosion

Image
Glacial mounds

Today, you can read about some of these speculations on the observation deck at this National Natural Landmark, which was established in 1966. You can also explore the self-guided interpretive trail, where colorful signs describe the geology, prairie ecology, and Native American use of the area. Depending on the season you visit, you might glimpse blooms of shooting stars, chocolate lilies, western buttercups, lupine, and bluebells, and on a clear day, you'll have a magnificent view of both Mount Rainier and Mount St. Helens — a perfect spot to ponder the mystery of the mounds.

Image

Image

In Depth

_________________
Quote:

"We ... would rather die on our feet than live on our knees." ~ Franklin D. Roosevelt


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic  [ 4454 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 358, 359 ... 372  Next

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:

Who is online

In total there are 120 users online :: 7 registered, 4 hidden and 109 guests (based on users active over the past 60 minutes)
Most users ever online was 2823 on Mar 26, 2012 6:26 pm

Users browsing this forum: AkitaMom, Google [Bot], grandwazoo, itsme, mtnwildflower, QueenCat, RkyMtnFool and 109 guests





Powered by phpBB © 2000-2012 phpBB Group

This website copyright © 1994-2018 by
Pinecam.com is a member of the Platte Canyon Area Chamber of Commerce