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 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Feb 14, 2019 9:13 am 
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Who Comes Up With All Those Cheesy Phrases On Valentine’s Day Candy Hearts?

Four out of five candy message hearts are made by the New England Confection Company (NECCO) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, which has been making the hearts since 1902.

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NECCO factory in 1905

There’s a NECCO vice president who makes the final decision about which sayings to retire and which new ones will replace them, typically a half dozen of each of the 125 phrases in circulation at any given time.

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Retired messages include HUBBA HUBBA, GROOVY, HANG TEN, DIG ME, and PAY ME.

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New ones include AWESOME, E-MAIL ME, TXT ME, and BE MY ICON or Tweet Me.

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Timely

Writing the slogans is a science, as well as an art, since there are only so many letters you can print onto one of those tiny hearts.

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Timeless


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 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Feb 14, 2019 12:38 pm 
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Necco ceased production of candy hearts. There are rumors of a buyout.

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 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Feb 14, 2019 12:54 pm 
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"Be My Icon"? Really? What does that even mean?

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 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Feb 14, 2019 1:06 pm 
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Maybe this is what it means. Be My Icon is a song, here's the lyrics:

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No need to be scared
You're gonna be so happy
I built you a shrine
Now you can be my icon
No need to be
Scared
I built you a shrine
Now you can be my icon


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 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Feb 14, 2019 1:09 pm 
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dieselpop1 wrote:
Necco ceased production of candy hearts. There are rumors of a buyout.


I believe the buyout already took place.

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 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Feb 14, 2019 2:10 pm 
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Ah, OK, "icon" as an object of near-religious adoration, not as a computer or cellphone thingie. OK, that sounds better, thanks TB.

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 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Feb 15, 2019 8:54 am 
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Your Appendix, Actually Useful?

Humans have been evolving for millions of years, and as a result, we have a few spare parts. We've got a leftover tailbone from when our ancestors lived in trees, some people have a tiny hole in front of their ears thanks to our ancestors with gills, and we all still have the same muscles monkeys use to move their ears around — except ours don't do anything, aside from entertaining the other kids on the playground. The appendix has long been at the top of that list of obsolete traits, but new research from Midwestern University says your appendix probably has a function after all.

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When most people think of evolution, they imagine that famous "monkey to man" image, where an organism evolves to be more complex as time goes on. But that's not always the case, or even the rule. Animals are just as likely to lose features through evolution as they are to gain them.

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Take the whale, for example. Its ancestors grew legs and emerged from the water, only to return and lose them again. But some traits keep coming back: the eye, wings, and legs, for example (unless you're a lizard—over and over, different lizards have lost their limbs to become more snake-like). The fact that those features evolved multiple times tells scientists that they're pretty useful, evolutionarily speaking. When an organism loses a trait for it never to be seen again, that suggests that it didn't provide much of a benefit.

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That's the approach Midwestern University researchers took for the 2017 study they published in the French scientific journal Comptes Rendus Palevol . They examined the evolution of 533 mammal species over 11 million years to find points where the appendix had emerged as a new trait or disappeared entirely. To support the common belief that the tiny organ is just a vestigial feature with no real benefit, the researchers would expect to see it evolve only a handful of times and disappear pretty regularly. But that's not what they found. Instead, the appendix appears to have evolved between 29 and 41 times, but only disappeared 12 times. It's clear that the appendix serves some purpose. But what is it?

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The leading theory about the appendix is that it supports the immune system. The study backs this up: Where they found an appendix, they also found lymph tissue, which is an essential part of the immune system and can aid in the growth of healthy gut bacteria. Other studies have shown that people without an appendix are more likely to suffer from bacterial infections than people with theirs intact.

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Of course, that mysterious organ does its fair share of damage, too. A quarter-million people come down with the painful and sometimes life-threatening condition of appendicitis every year, and the standard treatment is to remove the appendix completely. Most people live a long, healthy life after an appendectomy, however, which could mean that other parts of the immune system pick up the pace to make up for its absence.

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 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Feb 15, 2019 12:59 pm 
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From the Global Healing Center - What Does the Appendix Do?

Quote:
Far from being useless, the appendix may produce and protect beneficial probiotic colonies in the digestive system. According to researchers, the human digestive system is full of bacteria necessary to digest food. [1] When attack from diseases, sometimes these important kinds of bacteria are purged or killed off. In such situations, the appendix can act as a reserve for good bacteria. After the immune system beats off the disease, the bacteria emerge and re-colonize the gut.


I didn't know about the proximity of the lymph nodes to the appendix. The above is what I have read about in many places. So when we take an antibiotic that kills all our gut bacteria which leads to diarrhea, the necessary bacteria are replenished from our appendix.


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 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Feb 16, 2019 9:29 am 
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Typhoon Ida/Makurazaki

Talk about a one-two punch! A month after the devastation of the atomic bombing in August 1945, Hiroshima was struck by Typhoon Ida, which killed an estimated 2,000 people in the prefecture.

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Little Boy and Makurazaki

In Japan, Typhoon Ida was called Makurazaki Typhoon. It was the strongest typhoon to hit Kyushu on record, and packed winds of 140 mph. More than 2,000 people were killed in the Hiroshima Prefecture after heavy rains brought by a weakening Ida caused severe landslides.

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On September 17, 1945, the Makurazaki Typhoon hit Kagoshima Prefecture before moving north through Kyushu and into Honshu. This extremely strong typhoon caused great damage in Hiroshima Prefecture. The heavy rains it brought left most of Hiroshima City under water. Twenty bridges were washed away. In Hiroshima Prefecture alone, 1,229 people lost their lives, with 783 missing. Nationwide, 2,473 people died, with 1,283 missing.

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Over half of the casualties were in Hiroshima Prefecture. Hiroshima's city functions had already been destroyed by the bombing, and the Hiroshima District Meteorological Observatory, the prefectural government, City Hall, newspapers and radio were not yet fully recovered. Hiroshima's citizens had no idea the typhoon was coming, which left them more vulnerable. Still reeling from the bombing the previous month, Hiroshima was hit hard by the flood.

After the A-bomb…

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After the typhoon…

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Then and today…

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 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Feb 17, 2019 9:36 am 
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What Is The Most Densely Populated Country In The World?

The most densely populated country in the world is Monaco, with more than 55,000 people per square mile.

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Monaco is the second smallest country and monarchy in the world, and the majority of the population is made up of wealthy foreigners.

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The country lies on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea, and has no natural resources.

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In contrast, Singapore, a city-state where 4 million people live on an island of 239 square miles (621 sq km), has a population density of 16,736 people per square mile.

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Singapore

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And Malta has 3,076 people per square mile.

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Malta

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 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Feb 18, 2019 9:28 am 
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Charles de Gaulle

Born in Lille, France in 1890, Charles de Gaulle rose from French soldier in World War I to exiled leader and, eventually, president of the Fifth Republic, a position he held until 1969.

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De Gaulle's time as a commander in World War II would later influence his political career, providing him with a tenacious drive. His time as president was marked by the student and worker uprisings in 1968, which he responded to with an appeal for civil order.

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Charles de Gaulle is “everywhere” in modern France, its undisputed hero. This claim may strike you as both narrowly true and what a French thinker might call metaphysically false. His name is certainly everywhere—on the great airport outside Paris; on the Place Charles de Gaulle, once called the Étoile, where traffic streams perpetually around the Arc de Triomphe—but his example seems remote.

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He is more a ceremonial than a controversial figure, his work now done. You almost never heard him pointed to as an exemplar useful in any way for today’s crises. His name having been placed on l’Étoile is apt: the traffic goes around all day but never stops for long.

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De Gaulle had three rendezvous with history, in the old-fashioned sense he loved: in 1940, in 1958, and in 1968. On all three occasions, he saved the French state by sheer theatricality. First, by embodying the French republic in retreat from the Germans; then by seizing power, in a republican mode, to end the Algerian crisis; and, finally, when he ended the potential chaos of the May revolt by massing almost a million people on the Champs-Élysées in a counter-demonstration.

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After the liberation of Paris in August 1944, de Gaulle was given a hero's welcome in the French capital. As president of the provisional government, he guided France through the writing of the constitution on which the Fourth Republic was based. However, when his desires for a strong presidency were ignored, he resigned. An attempt to transform the political scene with a new party failed, and in 1953 he withdrew into retirement again.

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In 1958, a revolt in French-held Algeria, combined with serious instability within France, destroyed the Fourth Republic. De Gaulle returned to lead France once more. The French people approved a new constitution and voted de Gaulle president of the Fifth Republic. Strongly nationalistic, de Gaulle sought to strengthen his country financially and militarily. He sanctioned the development of nuclear weapons, withdrew France from NATO and vetoed the entry of Britain into the Common Market. He also granted independence to Algeria in the face of strong opposition at home and from French settlers in Algeria.

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In May 1968, violent demonstrations by university students shook de Gaulle's government. A general strike followed, paralyzing France and jeopardizing the Fifth Republic. De Gaulle held elections and the country rallied to him, ending the crisis.

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In April 1969, De Gaulle resigned the presidency after losing a referendum on a reform proposal. He retired to his estate at Colombey-les-Deux-Eglises and died of a heart attack on 9 November 1970. He was 79.

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 Post subject: Re: Interesting Facts
Post Posted: Feb 18, 2019 9:34 am 
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