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 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Jan 12, 2015 8:23 pm 
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We have a 5 yr old GS that we adopted at 2yrs. She has become dog/dog aggressive. We try to keep her a comfortable distance away from other dogs (always on lead). We keep her on a short leash when we encounter other dogs and try to get her to sit when strange dogs approach. I know that GS are not "dog park" dogs, but I would like to be able to enjoy our walks!


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 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Jan 13, 2015 5:30 pm 
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whybehave wrote:
We have a 5 yr old GS that we adopted at 2yrs. She has become dog/dog aggressive. We try to keep her a comfortable distance away from other dogs (always on lead). We keep her on a short leash when we encounter other dogs and try to get her to sit when strange dogs approach. I know that GS are not "dog park" dogs, but I would like to be able to enjoy our walks!


http://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/reactive-dog-foundation-exercises-for-your-leash-reactive-dog

Here is a link, the distance you have to keep your dog away from a distraction is up to your dog. It isn't up to you. They decide how far away the other dog has to be to make them comfortable so they will not react or stop reacting to it. To train your dog to stop being leash reactive and also enjoy the walk to a point that she no longer has an issue with other dogs takes time. A "short leash" will make the problem worse and makes your dog feel more confined and more reactive when other dogs come near. Most people do not have the patients to deal with the leash reactive dog and will take a shortcut, often putting a "prong collar" on the dog. This will only serve to stop behaviors in the short term by "shutting down" the dog. This does not teach the dog how to deal with their fears. Yes, I said fear your dog is being REACTIVE not aggressive. No Dominance has NOTHING to do with it either. Understanding the behavior, why the dog is displaying it and dealing with it appropriately is key. Maybe your dog does not enjoy the company of other dogs, I don't know I have not met her, nor have I seen her behavior. Leash reactive dogs come in many shapes and sizes so to speak. However, they are all fear based and if dealt with in a positive way and given the proper tools to deal with those fears they get over them and learn to trust their handlers. That trust is the most important part of the relationship, because then it will not matter what dogs come up to her, when or where. She can learn to be confident in herself and you to support her emotions and help her through any situation.

"Making her sit" currently puts her in a defenseless posture and she already feels threatened, therefore I am sure that is a struggle. Ultimately, communication, understanding and timing are going to be key factors. I strongly suggest getting this book : http://www.amazon.com/Feisty-Fido-Help-Leash-Reactive-Dog/dp/1891767070/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1421191303&sr=1-1&keywords=Reactive+Rover

I would be more then happy to help you with this issue. Feel free to give me a call. 720-272-1668

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 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Mar 5, 2015 12:28 pm 
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Hi Natalie We have a 1 yr old poodle/Pomeranian mix who is a really good dog, except for his anxiety when we prepare to leave the house and while we are gone. His barking starts as soon as we pick up the keys, a coat, walk down the hall or pretty much anything that indicates we might be leaving. While we are gone (we have a pet cam) he whimpers and looks out the window never relaxing. We have tried kong toys and other busy toys, but his anxiety is too high for him to have interest in those. I have used a citronella spray collar on him and it works like a charm when we're home. I don't put it on him when we're gone. He is confined to an 6'x10' entryway separate from our two larger dogs who outweigh him by 60 lbs. They play too rough to leave them all together since he is so little - 15 lbs.

Any suggestions would be appreciated. If you think we need you to come to the house, let me know and we can arrange something. Thanks a lot.


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 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Mar 29, 2015 3:08 pm 
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Hello Natalie
We have two 7 year old golden/newfie mixes. Murphy is neutered and Sophie is spayed and they were litter mates raised together.
At night, when I let them out, Murphy will start to "hump" Sophie for 2-3 minutes. He will get down if I tell him to but will look for another opportunity. This only happens at night and only outside maybe once or twice.
Any ideas on this?
Thanks

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 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Apr 6, 2015 10:30 pm 
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danceswithhorses wrote:
Hello Natalie
We have two 7 year old golden/newfie mixes. Murphy is neutered and Sophie is spayed and they were litter mates raised together.
At night, when I let them out, Murphy will start to "hump" Sophie for 2-3 minutes. He will get down if I tell him to but will look for another opportunity. This only happens at night and only outside maybe once or twice.
Any ideas on this?
Thanks


Has this been going on for 7 years? Did it just start? You say maybe once or twice... a night? week? month? For the most part unless it is hurting Sophie in some way I would suggest you pay it no mind, paying attention to it will (and probably has) caused the behavior to stick around. Why he is doing that, well the number one reason is that it feels good. Without knowing much more about the inner workings of their relationship and behaviors it is hard to say. I can say with absolute certainty that it has nothing to do with dominance, Murphy is not dominating his sister.

Now if Murphy's behavior is hurting Sophie then I suggest management, and that means you let her out first and when she is done and comes in then Murphy goes out (this at night only). This way Murphy can not mount Sophie. Or you leash him for the next several weeks also controlling the behavior. After several weeks he may just not return to it and you could be okay with going back to the old routine.

Could be worth a try,
Good Luck
Natalie

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 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Apr 6, 2015 10:53 pm 
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Lacypatrick wrote:
Hi Natalie We have a 1 yr old poodle/Pomeranian mix who is a really good dog, except for his anxiety when we prepare to leave the house and while we are gone. His barking starts as soon as we pick up the keys, a coat, walk down the hall or pretty much anything that indicates we might be leaving. While we are gone (we have a pet cam) he whimpers and looks out the window never relaxing. We have tried kong toys and other busy toys, but his anxiety is too high for him to have interest in those. I have used a citronella spray collar on him and it works like a charm when we're home. I don't put it on him when we're gone. He is confined to an 6'x10' entryway separate from our two larger dogs who outweigh him by 60 lbs. They play too rough to leave them all together since he is so little - 15 lbs.

Any suggestions would be appreciated. If you think we need you to come to the house, let me know and we can arrange something. Thanks a lot.


So sorry this slipped right past me!!

First thing I am going to suggest is a Calming Collar (DAP Collar) ask for it by name at Buster's Natural Pet Supply. Then I am going to say that the bark collar is not helping with the overall level of anxiety even if you don't use it when you are not home. Your dog has anxiety all the time not just when you leave, so I would suggest some confidence building situations like training, walks and play times. Work on the barking by rewarding quiet dog time, praise the quiet dog and don't "see" the barking dog. Timing is very important, you have to be quick and understand it may get worse before it gets better. He may start barking insistently for a while, stick to your guns, this will stop and he will figure out you want the quiet dog. Lavish the quiet dog with praise and attention!!

Next desensitize him to your leaving procedures, walk around the house with your keys in your hands until he calms down. Put the keys down and reward him. Pick up the jacket , then put on your shoes get him to the point he no longer is getting anxious about you interacting with any of these items. Then start working on the door. Short periods of time, walk out then in come back be happy to see him, when hes calm, leave again just for a minute, over and over. You have to do this until he is to the point he is not reacting to it, even looking forward to the rewards you bring back with you or shower him with for being calm, only reward the calm dog. This may take several weeks of short sessions or it may work in a few short days, depends on the dog.

Here is a wonderful link with some more ideas:

http://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/separation-anxiety-solution-training-fido-that-calm-behavior-makes-you

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 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Apr 7, 2015 6:58 am 
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http://www.successdogs.com/dog-informat ... m-barking/ and another link for that unwanted barking;-)

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 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Apr 7, 2015 9:49 am 
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Thank you Natalie. I will do the things you suggest. He is in obedience class and working on quiet stays is helping. I like the idea of desensitizing him - great suggestion.


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Post Posted: Apr 7, 2015 2:43 pm 
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Natalie wrote:
danceswithhorses wrote:
Hello Natalie
We have two 7 year old golden/newfie mixes. Murphy is neutered and Sophie is spayed and they were litter mates raised together.
At night, when I let them out, Murphy will start to "hump" Sophie for 2-3 minutes. He will get down if I tell him to but will look for another opportunity. This only happens at night and only outside maybe once or twice.
Any ideas on this?
Thanks


Has this been going on for 7 years? Did it just start? You say maybe once or twice... a night? week? month? For the most part unless it is hurting Sophie in some way I would suggest you pay it no mind, paying attention to it will (and probably has) caused the behavior to stick around. Why he is doing that, well the number one reason is that it feels good. Without knowing much more about the inner workings of their relationship and behaviors it is hard to say. I can say with absolute certainty that it has nothing to do with dominance, Murphy is not dominating his sister.

Now if Murphy's behavior is hurting Sophie then I suggest management, and that means you let her out first and when she is done and comes in then Murphy goes out (this at night only). This way Murphy can not mount Sophie. Or you leash him for the next several weeks also controlling the behavior. After several weeks he may just not return to it and you could be okay with going back to the old routine.

Could be worth a try,
Good Luck
Natalie


Hi
This has been going on for about 3-4 years, does not hurt Sophie and in fact she stands for it. I don't really care, but I wanted to find out the reason. Murphy does this once or twice every single night and only after dark. I'll start ignoring it like you suggested and if it becomes a problem, I'll leash him or let them out separately.
Thank you!

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 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Apr 9, 2015 6:39 am 
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We just got a new member to our family from the IMHS last week. He is 2yo male husky/red healer and a real sweetheart. Gets along great with our 13yo husky/collie. Seems to be a fast learner. The first night tried to jump into bed with us, we said down, and that was it. He sleeps on the floor next to us. Had a chewing problem right away, but quickly learned to chew just the chew toys we gave him. Being retired, we are home most of the time, but the day came when we had to leave him alone. We discovered he has separation anxiety! First, just getting out of the house without him was a chore. When we got home we saw he managed to pull the molding down from around the door, chew two chairs, and pull a coat down from the coat rack and chew that too. We noticed he follows us from room to room, never letting us out of his sight. Any suggestions on how to help him?


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 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: May 8, 2015 11:38 am 
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Minara wrote:
We just got a new member to our family from the IMHS last week. He is 2yo male husky/red healer and a real sweetheart. Gets along great with our 13yo husky/collie. Seems to be a fast learner. The first night tried to jump into bed with us, we said down, and that was it. He sleeps on the floor next to us. Had a chewing problem right away, but quickly learned to chew just the chew toys we gave him. Being retired, we are home most of the time, but the day came when we had to leave him alone. We discovered he has separation anxiety! First, just getting out of the house without him was a chore. When we got home we saw he managed to pull the molding down from around the door, chew two chairs, and pull a coat down from the coat rack and chew that too. We noticed he follows us from room to room, never letting us out of his sight. Any suggestions on how to help him?


How is this dog doing? I am sorry that I did not see this post sooner. I would suggest a DAP Calming collar to start, I am sure he has calmed down some since you started with him. Sometimes time is our best friend in these situations. IF he is still having issues then working with him to desensitize him to your leaving process. Make the fact that you are leaving somthing fun, and practice with him in short bursts. First start by picking up your keys or putting on your jacket, if this causes him to become upset just walk around the house or sit until he is calm and then remove your jacket, put down the keys and reward the dog. Work on that until he no longer gets upset about these things, then move to adding short intervals with you going out of the house and returning. reward calm behavior.

Here is a wonderful article for you to follow as well.

http://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/separation-anxiety-solution-training-fido-that-calm-behavior-makes-you

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 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Jul 8, 2015 11:50 am 
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We have a female Jack Russell Terrier who will be one year old next month. Despite every effort possible, she is still not housebroken.

She loves being outside in our enclosed back yard, and I let her spend a lot of time there. But, as soon as I bring her inside, she either pees or poops on the carpet. I somehow never catch her in the act when I can scold her, but rather find her deposits later.

When I happen to see her do her business outside, I go out of my way to praise her and tell her what a good dog she is.

It’s gotten to the point, where I just leave the carpet shampooer out, because I know I’m going to need it almost every day.

I’m at the end of my wits. What can we do?

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