It is currently Jul 22, 2018 12:14 pm 




If you are looking for a new pet, click here for pets for needing adoption, rescue, or for sale.
Click here for lost/found pets and click here for pet related advertisements.

Image Rainbow Bridge page Image Add your fur baby here Image



Reply to topic  [ 597 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 46, 47, 48, 49, 50  Next

Previous topic | Next topic 

  Print view

Offline 
 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Oct 17, 2015 4:05 pm 
Whoa momma! A top Pinecam poster!
Whoa momma! A top Pinecam poster!
User avatar
Joined: Sep 10, 2004 6:55 pm
Posts: 1598
Location: Where ever the dogs take me.
You may be doing something she finds aversive when you call her or when she comes to you. If your tone is harsh, or if you pet her to enthusiastically when she gets there she may not like that and not want to get that response from you. The command may be poisoned as a result and you may have to retrain her to a new command. She also may be loosing her hearing and your movement towards her she sees and that is what she pays attention to. You can try some tests and see if that is the case. http://eileenanddogs.com/2012/12/10/rep ... soned-cue/

_________________
"The Greatness of a Nation can be judged by the way it treats it's animals." -Mahatma Gandhi

"If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives; Be kind anyway." -Mother Teresa Of Calcutta

http://www.pinecam.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=20745


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Jan 28, 2016 1:02 pm 
Infrequent Pinecam poster
Infrequent Pinecam poster
Joined: Jan 15, 2016 2:21 pm
Posts: 44
Hello!!!

So I have two different questions for our two different dogs. Some information: we do not have a fenced yard and have about one acre of property. Our neighbors let their dogs run free and do not restrain where they go so we constantly have random dogs coming onto our property and up to our house.

1. We have a three year old neutered pit bull/lab mix, "R", and he is extremely sweet and obedient to us in the house and outside of the house. My partner has had him since he was a puppy and I have been in his life for about a year. He does not have a leash when he goes outside as he listens very well and has not tried to leave the yard or run away even if we aren't outside with him. However, he does not do well on first meetings with people. He growls at them and has nipped at a few hands that have been stuck out his way for him to sniff. He is very standoffish and slightly aggressive to anyone new. Also, a neighbors dog wondered into our driveway the other day while we were all outside and "R" took off and ran up to the dog and got very aggressive with him for maybe a few seconds and then ran back to us. We were calling him the whole time, but it seemed he had to assert his dominance over this other dog before he decided to listen to us. He will growl at anyone that walks by on the street below our house, but does not try to chase after them or leave the yard. We cannot take him on walks as he will get very aggressive with any animal he sees or any person he sees while away from home, which makes me very sad because I would love to walk him and socialize him more. He also seems to respond better to scolding than to praise and treats, which is a new one for me. He has hardly any interest in treats when I have tried to reward him positively or hold his attention when someone is walking by. Any ideas?

2. We just adopted a second dog, a neutered one year old Husky/border collie mix, "T". He is very sweet with people and loves attention. He seems to do well with other dogs besides wanting to nip at them initially, but he does not growl or seem to be aggressive with them at all. To my knowledge, we are his first family as he was taken from a reservation in New Mexico and then spent the rest of his life, until we got him, in shelters. He is very excitable and when we try to pet him, he gets so excited that he can't sit still and tries to bite our hands. We stop petting him when he bites and he just acts like he wants more attention and for us to pet him and then does the same thing if we try to. We have been working with him on basic commands and he knows to sit and is learning to lay down when we tell him to. He is extremely stubborn and jumps up into people's faces while they are sitting down and will dead weight his entire body when asked to get down or off or is pushed away. He will try to run away if we let him off his lead (20ft) outside our house and will not come back if called. He also tries to chew socks, our couch, the coffee table, paper towels, etc. Whatever he can get his mouth on lol. I would say our main difficulties with him are his chewing and biting and he has nipped me several times on various body parts. We have many toys and antlers for him to chew on and play with. He also has a huge problem with barking at anything or anyone he can see outside of the windows or while he is in the yard, including his own reflection in the window! Any ideas for this excitable bundle of energy?

Thank you!


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Jan 28, 2016 8:28 pm 
Whoa momma! A top Pinecam poster!
Whoa momma! A top Pinecam poster!
User avatar
Joined: Jan 19, 2007 9:32 am
Posts: 1926
Location: all over the map
Hey Natalie,

I just wanted to thank you for helping my friend out with her puppy. Eva and Jacks (aka Cujo)

You helped me with one of my dogs years ago and I have referred you to several people because you do great work and I just want to say that you are a god send for dogs and the people they own.


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Jan 31, 2016 1:36 am 
Whoa momma! A top Pinecam poster!
Whoa momma! A top Pinecam poster!
User avatar
Joined: Sep 10, 2004 6:55 pm
Posts: 1598
Location: Where ever the dogs take me.
Quote:
1. We have a three year old neutered pit bull/lab mix, "R", and he is extremely sweet and obedient to us in the house and outside of the house. My partner has had him since he was a puppy and I have been in his life for about a year. He does not have a leash when he goes outside as he listens very well and has not tried to leave the yard or run away even if we aren't outside with him. However, he does not do well on first meetings with people. He growls at them and has nipped at a few hands that have been stuck out his way for him to sniff. He is very standoffish and slightly aggressive to anyone new. Also, a neighbors dog wondered into our driveway the other day while we were all outside and "R" took off and ran up to the dog and got very aggressive with him for maybe a few seconds and then ran back to us. We were calling him the whole time, but it seemed he had to assert his dominance over this other dog before he decided to listen to us. He will growl at anyone that walks by on the street below our house, but does not try to chase after them or leave the yard. We cannot take him on walks as he will get very aggressive with any animal he sees or any person he sees while away from home, which makes me very sad because I would love to walk him and socialize him more. He also seems to respond better to scolding than to praise and treats, which is a new one for me. He has hardly any interest in treats when I have tried to reward him positively or hold his attention when someone is walking by. Any ideas?
Yes, I can help. The reason he will not take food or treats is because he is "over threshold" meaning that in any given situation he is too close to the stimulus for food to be of any interest. He is worried and fearful this is why he is barking, growling and offering to bite the "friendly" hand. The barks and growls are communication tools to tell you he is uncomfortable with the situation. If he is punished for these things he will stop the communication and the only thing he has left is to bite to get the person to go away. All dogs love food, the right food at the right time is key. Dealing with kind of behavior can be very difficult without great timing and understanding of canine behavior, I will suggest a book first. Then I will suggest a Free Consultation with us to guide you with further training before the behavior really gets out of hand. http://www.barnesandnoble.com/p/the-cautious-canine-patricia-b-mcconnell/1003000414/2694569314982?st=PLA&sid=BNB_DRS_Marketplace+Shopping+greatbookprices_00000000&2sid=Google_&sourceId=PLGoP24185&k_clickid=3x24185


Quote:
2. We just adopted a second dog, a neutered one year old Husky/border collie mix, "T". He is very sweet with people and loves attention. He seems to do well with other dogs besides wanting to nip at them initially, but he does not growl or seem to be aggressive with them at all. To my knowledge, we are his first family as he was taken from a reservation in New Mexico and then spent the rest of his life, until we got him, in shelters. He is very excitable and when we try to pet him, he gets so excited that he can't sit still and tries to bite our hands. We stop petting him when he bites and he just acts like he wants more attention and for us to pet him and then does the same thing if we try to. We have been working with him on basic commands and he knows to sit and is learning to lay down when we tell him to. He is extremely stubborn and jumps up into people's faces while they are sitting down and will dead weight his entire body when asked to get down or off or is pushed away. He will try to run away if we let him off his lead (20ft) outside our house and will not come back if called. He also tries to chew socks, our couch, the coffee table, paper towels, etc. Whatever he can get his mouth on lol. I would say our main difficulties with him are his chewing and biting and he has nipped me several times on various body parts. We have many toys and antlers for him to chew on and play with. He also has a huge problem with barking at anything or anyone he can see outside of the windows or while he is in the yard, including his own reflection in the window! Any ideas for this excitable bundle of energy?
Not stubborn, lacking in self control, he needs training and guidance. http://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/the-learn-to-earn-program

Teach Your Dog Self-control
By The Dog Daily Expert

Teach Your Dog Self-control
Some dogs may inherently have more self-control than others, but proper training can solve most canine behavioral issues.

Self-control is a complex behavior that involves many components. For example, it’s tied to an individual’s state of mind. If you -- or your dog -- are anxious, you will likely feel more jittery and less in control. This can be connected to thyroid function and other health issues, helping to explain why some people may seem more anxious than others.

Self-control, however, is also a product of teaching. When you were younger, your mother probably taught you to sit up straight, be quiet under certain circumstances and more. Without such teaching, you may fall back on other behaviors. The same is true for dogs. As Gerilyn Bielakiewicz and Andrea Mattei point out in their book The Only Dog Training Book You’ll Ever Need: From Avoiding Accidents to Banishing Barking, the Basics for Raising a Well-Behaved Dog, dogs will never develop proper concentration, which is critical to obedience skills, if they do not learn self-control.

Bielakiewicz and Mattei suggest playing the following game with your dog to help teach or reinforce self-control:

1. Go into a quiet room with your dog and sit down. Have a clicker, some dog food treats, a radio or TV, and toys nearby.

2. Wait a while. Appear to ignore your dog, but then suddenly click. When your dog pays attention to you, offer a treat snack.

3. Repeat this a few times.

4. Now, create a distraction. You could turn on the radio, roll a ball on the floor or do something else. The goal is just to distract your furry pal.

5. Now use the clicker. Per before, when your dog pays attention, offer the food reward.

Repeat with various types of distractors.

6. While outside, you might also use the clicker in a controlled situation with another dog, or even a cat, present. The next step would then be to reinforce the “Sit” and “Stay” commands after your dog has learned to pay attention to you. Even if your dog is thinking, “I want to get at that dog!” it will use proper self-control and restraint if it is trained correctly.
http://www.thedogdaily.com/conduct/training/teach_dog_self_control/index.html

_________________
"The Greatness of a Nation can be judged by the way it treats it's animals." -Mahatma Gandhi

"If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives; Be kind anyway." -Mother Teresa Of Calcutta

http://www.pinecam.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=20745


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Jan 31, 2016 1:38 am 
Whoa momma! A top Pinecam poster!
Whoa momma! A top Pinecam poster!
User avatar
Joined: Sep 10, 2004 6:55 pm
Posts: 1598
Location: Where ever the dogs take me.
HAMM wrote:
Hey Natalie,

I just wanted to thank you for helping my friend out with her puppy. Eva and Jacks (aka Cujo)

You helped me with one of my dogs years ago and I have referred you to several people because you do great work and I just want to say that you are a god send for dogs and the people they own.



Thank you so much for the recommendation HAMM!! We just love Jacks and his family they are great and he is going to be just fine!

_________________
"The Greatness of a Nation can be judged by the way it treats it's animals." -Mahatma Gandhi

"If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives; Be kind anyway." -Mother Teresa Of Calcutta

http://www.pinecam.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=20745


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Feb 1, 2016 12:18 pm 
Infrequent Pinecam poster
Infrequent Pinecam poster
Joined: Jan 15, 2016 2:21 pm
Posts: 44
Natalie wrote:
Quote:
1. We have a three year old neutered pit bull/lab mix, "R", and he is extremely sweet and obedient to us in the house and outside of the house. My partner has had him since he was a puppy and I have been in his life for about a year. He does not have a leash when he goes outside as he listens very well and has not tried to leave the yard or run away even if we aren't outside with him. However, he does not do well on first meetings with people. He growls at them and has nipped at a few hands that have been stuck out his way for him to sniff. He is very standoffish and slightly aggressive to anyone new. Also, a neighbors dog wondered into our driveway the other day while we were all outside and "R" took off and ran up to the dog and got very aggressive with him for maybe a few seconds and then ran back to us. We were calling him the whole time, but it seemed he had to assert his dominance over this other dog before he decided to listen to us. He will growl at anyone that walks by on the street below our house, but does not try to chase after them or leave the yard. We cannot take him on walks as he will get very aggressive with any animal he sees or any person he sees while away from home, which makes me very sad because I would love to walk him and socialize him more. He also seems to respond better to scolding than to praise and treats, which is a new one for me. He has hardly any interest in treats when I have tried to reward him positively or hold his attention when someone is walking by. Any ideas?
Yes, I can help. The reason he will not take food or treats is because he is "over threshold" meaning that in any given situation he is too close to the stimulus for food to be of any interest. He is worried and fearful this is why he is barking, growling and offering to bite the "friendly" hand. The barks and growls are communication tools to tell you he is uncomfortable with the situation. If he is punished for these things he will stop the communication and the only thing he has left is to bite to get the person to go away. All dogs love food, the right food at the right time is key. Dealing with kind of behavior can be very difficult without great timing and understanding of canine behavior, I will suggest a book first. Then I will suggest a Free Consultation with us to guide you with further training before the behavior really gets out of hand. http://www.barnesandnoble.com/p/the-cautious-canine-patricia-b-mcconnell/1003000414/2694569314982?st=PLA&sid=BNB_DRS_Marketplace+Shopping+greatbookprices_00000000&2sid=Google_&sourceId=PLGoP24185&k_clickid=3x24185


Quote:
2. We just adopted a second dog, a neutered one year old Husky/border collie mix, "T". He is very sweet with people and loves attention. He seems to do well with other dogs besides wanting to nip at them initially, but he does not growl or seem to be aggressive with them at all. To my knowledge, we are his first family as he was taken from a reservation in New Mexico and then spent the rest of his life, until we got him, in shelters. He is very excitable and when we try to pet him, he gets so excited that he can't sit still and tries to bite our hands. We stop petting him when he bites and he just acts like he wants more attention and for us to pet him and then does the same thing if we try to. We have been working with him on basic commands and he knows to sit and is learning to lay down when we tell him to. He is extremely stubborn and jumps up into people's faces while they are sitting down and will dead weight his entire body when asked to get down or off or is pushed away. He will try to run away if we let him off his lead (20ft) outside our house and will not come back if called. He also tries to chew socks, our couch, the coffee table, paper towels, etc. Whatever he can get his mouth on lol. I would say our main difficulties with him are his chewing and biting and he has nipped me several times on various body parts. We have many toys and antlers for him to chew on and play with. He also has a huge problem with barking at anything or anyone he can see outside of the windows or while he is in the yard, including his own reflection in the window! Any ideas for this excitable bundle of energy?
Not stubborn, lacking in self control, he needs training and guidance. http://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/the-learn-to-earn-program

Teach Your Dog Self-control
By The Dog Daily Expert

Teach Your Dog Self-control
Some dogs may inherently have more self-control than others, but proper training can solve most canine behavioral issues.

Self-control is a complex behavior that involves many components. For example, it’s tied to an individual’s state of mind. If you -- or your dog -- are anxious, you will likely feel more jittery and less in control. This can be connected to thyroid function and other health issues, helping to explain why some people may seem more anxious than others.

Self-control, however, is also a product of teaching. When you were younger, your mother probably taught you to sit up straight, be quiet under certain circumstances and more. Without such teaching, you may fall back on other behaviors. The same is true for dogs. As Gerilyn Bielakiewicz and Andrea Mattei point out in their book The Only Dog Training Book You’ll Ever Need: From Avoiding Accidents to Banishing Barking, the Basics for Raising a Well-Behaved Dog, dogs will never develop proper concentration, which is critical to obedience skills, if they do not learn self-control.

Bielakiewicz and Mattei suggest playing the following game with your dog to help teach or reinforce self-control:

1. Go into a quiet room with your dog and sit down. Have a clicker, some dog food treats, a radio or TV, and toys nearby.

2. Wait a while. Appear to ignore your dog, but then suddenly click. When your dog pays attention to you, offer a treat snack.

3. Repeat this a few times.

4. Now, create a distraction. You could turn on the radio, roll a ball on the floor or do something else. The goal is just to distract your furry pal.

5. Now use the clicker. Per before, when your dog pays attention, offer the food reward.

Repeat with various types of distractors.

6. While outside, you might also use the clicker in a controlled situation with another dog, or even a cat, present. The next step would then be to reinforce the “Sit” and “Stay” commands after your dog has learned to pay attention to you. Even if your dog is thinking, “I want to get at that dog!” it will use proper self-control and restraint if it is trained correctly.
http://www.thedogdaily.com/conduct/training/teach_dog_self_control/index.html



Awesome!!! Thank you so much Natalie! I will check out the book and be in touch. :)


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Mar 26, 2016 3:18 pm 
Active Pinecam Poster
Active Pinecam Poster
User avatar
Joined: Sep 7, 2012 11:22 pm
Posts: 416
Location: Bailey
Got a 12 week old mastiff pup He constantly bites trying to play, when we walk into the room he goes for our pants things like that. We have tried yelping like a hurt pup, growling, clapping, distracting him with a toy and a squirt bottle best response it to a loud noise like clapping however this does not always work and you have to do it hard wich hurts to do over and over. He is otherwise a good dog.

_________________
Don't tred on me...


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Mar 26, 2016 3:41 pm 
Whoa momma! A top Pinecam poster!
Whoa momma! A top Pinecam poster!
User avatar
Joined: Sep 10, 2004 6:55 pm
Posts: 1598
Location: Where ever the dogs take me.
You have tried a lot of different ideas, but you haven't tried being consistent. First of all, puppies chewing and grabbing at clothes and hands is normal behavior, not bad behavior. So, when there is natural behavior we start with management of the dog then teach the dog appropriate behavior when playing with humans. We manage the puppy so we can live with them during this phase of their lives. Good news is the behavior is not permanent, nor is your puppy trying to be dominant. Management comes in many forms, play, training and confinement. Giving the puppy time to have play with other young dogs will teach him bite inhibition, training with your puppy will give him guidance and giving your puppy a quiet place to go that is safe will teach him the start of self control.

We offer group puppy classes at Evergreen Park and Recreation Wulf Center and new classes will start on April 19th. Group classes are a great way to learn more about your puppy and a wonderful resource for their development into happy dogs.

_________________
"The Greatness of a Nation can be judged by the way it treats it's animals." -Mahatma Gandhi

"If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives; Be kind anyway." -Mother Teresa Of Calcutta

http://www.pinecam.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=20745


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: **Puppy and Dog Obedience/ Behavior Classes**
Post Posted: Aug 16, 2016 4:04 pm 
Active Pinecam Poster
Active Pinecam Poster
Joined: Mar 18, 2008 11:32 am
Posts: 586
can you give me free advice on our 8 month old Shi-Poo male having a REALLY hard time with potty training? Any advice would be helpful... He's been kennel trained since he was 9 weeks old, loves his "house", take him out constantly, huge praises and rewards... But for some reason, he likes to pee on the top of the couch? I've disciplined him a zillion times for it, now it's covered with plastic. He used the Potty training pads VERY well up till about 6 months, then it was like he got worse. He does have an older cock-a-poo sister (3) that he adores, they are best of friends.... Just don't know what to do anymore. I'm 60 and I've owned quite a few puppies and dogs in my lifetime... this little guy has really got me puzzled. He goes out at least once per hour, I take the water dish away in early evening. I CARRY him to go outside to go potty due to him stopping on our stairs halfway to pee on stairs??? I just don't understand why he is worse now than when he was even younger. And really doesn't understand the word "NO", 'POTTY OUTSIDE"!!! JUMPS UP ON THE COUCH (MAKES ME REALLY NERVOUS) I look him eye to eye, "get down (yelling) get down, get down, get down, (then I move his little butt) DOWN!! He just looks at me...... :bash:


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Oct 13, 2016 7:56 am 
Prolific Pinecam Poster
Prolific Pinecam Poster
Joined: Aug 14, 2002 9:57 am
Posts: 939
Location: hilldale pines
Hi Natalie, not sure if you can help me out or not. My 65 lb 6month old pyrenees/bernese apparently ate something bad (I have caught her eating voles that the cat killed, actually anything she can get ahold of). Since yesterday afternoon, she will not eat dog food or treats. She is drinking water. Just laying around without her usual smile. Can I give her pepto bismo or something? Sorry if this is the wrong thread

_________________
Just please yourself. Others will follow


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: **Puppy and Dog Obedience/ Behavior Classes**
Post Posted: Oct 13, 2016 10:03 am 
Whoa momma! A top Pinecam poster!
Whoa momma! A top Pinecam poster!
User avatar
Joined: Sep 10, 2004 6:55 pm
Posts: 1598
Location: Where ever the dogs take me.
I sure can give you some free advice, you are probably not going to like it though.

#1 Stop yelling at your dog
#2 Stop punishing your dog
#3 Stop blaming your dog

You are creating fear, you are intimidating your puppy. You are scaring him into peeing on your couch. It is not his fault. He needs your help, understanding and emotional support. Calm down, its only pee. HE isn't doing it to make you mad, he doesn't "like" to pee on the couch. You taught him it was ok to pee in the house by using potty pads in the first place. If housebreaking is not going your way, start over.

Here is my "free" advice: Make his space smaller, block off access to the couch. Put a house line on him ( a 8 foot small rope to drag) encourage him to continue to go outside. NEVER punish him for having an accident. You can hit a pillow and yell at yourself if that will make you more aware of his need to go potty outside. If he has to go down a flight of stairs to get outside he may not understand the connection. And before you tell me he does understand, you need to understand that dogs are not capable of purposely avoiding a well understood idea. If they understand they will do it. It is called Generalization :

Quote:
" Generalizing

http://dogmantics.com/generalizing/

By Emily Larlham

Generalizing simply means, teaching your dog that when you ask him to perform a behavior, it means the same thing regardless of the scenario or environment you are in. Dogs do not generalize as well as us humans do, so it can make it very difficult for us to understand what they are going through when we ask them to do a behavior they already know in a scenario that they are unfamiliar with. An example of how dogs do not generalize well is: You may think to yourself, “my dog knows sit”. But if you stand with your head buried in the corner of the room and ask your dog to sit, he most likely won’t. Also, if your dog only fetches a ball and you throw your car keys for your dog and say “Fetch”, most likely your dog will look confused and not pick them up. Sometimes simply taking two steps to the right in the training session when your dog is learning something new, will throw your dog off and make it seem like he has no clue as to what you were asking for.

To not get stuck on the same level of behavior and to make sure that your dog can generalize well, you need to be increasing criteria constantly and begin generalizing a behavior to other scenarios as soon as you can. Once you have gotten a behavior on cue, it’s time to move on to having your dog perform the behavior on different surfaces, in different locations, with different distractions, and in different positions in relation to yourself."


HELP your dog, do not blame him. If he is doing something you don't like he does not understand what you want. Period. Oh and take him to the vet, make sure he doesn't have an urinary tract infection.



tomcat wrote:
can you give me free advice on our 8 month old Shi-Poo male having a REALLY hard time with potty training? Any advice would be helpful... He's been kennel trained since he was 9 weeks old, loves his "house", take him out constantly, huge praises and rewards... But for some reason, he likes to pee on the top of the couch? I've disciplined him a zillion times for it, now it's covered with plastic. He used the Potty training pads VERY well up till about 6 months, then it was like he got worse. He does have an older cock-a-poo sister (3) that he adores, they are best of friends.... Just don't know what to do anymore. I'm 60 and I've owned quite a few puppies and dogs in my lifetime... this little guy has really got me puzzled. He goes out at least once per hour, I take the water dish away in early evening. I CARRY him to go outside to go potty due to him stopping on our stairs halfway to pee on stairs??? I just don't understand why he is worse now than when he was even younger. And really doesn't understand the word "NO", 'POTTY OUTSIDE"!!! JUMPS UP ON THE COUCH (MAKES ME REALLY NERVOUS) I look him eye to eye, "get down (yelling) get down, get down, get down, (then I move his little butt) DOWN!! He just looks at me...... :bash:

_________________
"The Greatness of a Nation can be judged by the way it treats it's animals." -Mahatma Gandhi

"If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives; Be kind anyway." -Mother Teresa Of Calcutta

http://www.pinecam.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=20745


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Offline 
 Post subject: Re: **FREE advice from a Local, Professional, Dog Trainer**
Post Posted: Oct 13, 2016 10:06 am 
Whoa momma! A top Pinecam poster!
Whoa momma! A top Pinecam poster!
User avatar
Joined: Sep 10, 2004 6:55 pm
Posts: 1598
Location: Where ever the dogs take me.
PLEASE!!! Take you dog to the VET IMMEDIATELY!!!
HE could have ingested a poisoned mouse or small animal!!
This could kill him if he is not treated ASAP!!!!




mtnmaiden wrote:
Hi Natalie, not sure if you can help me out or not. My 65 lb 6month old pyrenees/bernese apparently ate something bad (I have caught her eating voles that the cat killed, actually anything she can get ahold of). Since yesterday afternoon, she will not eat dog food or treats. She is drinking water. Just laying around without her usual smile. Can I give her pepto bismo or something? Sorry if this is the wrong thread

_________________
"The Greatness of a Nation can be judged by the way it treats it's animals." -Mahatma Gandhi

"If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives; Be kind anyway." -Mother Teresa Of Calcutta

http://www.pinecam.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=20745


Top
  Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic  [ 597 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 46, 47, 48, 49, 50  Next

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:

Who is online

In total there are 46 users online :: 1 registered, 0 hidden and 45 guests (based on users active over the past 60 minutes)
Most users ever online was 2823 on Mar 26, 2012 7:26 pm

Users browsing this forum: Majestic-12 [Bot] and 45 guests





Powered by phpBB © 2000-2012 phpBB Group

This website copyright © 1994-2018 by
Pinecam.com is a member of the Platte Canyon Area Chamber of Commerce